Monthly Archives: April 2014

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Step It Up To Get It Down

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If you or a loved one has type 2 diabetes, you’re not alone. More than 18 million Americans have type 2 diabetes.

For many people with type 2 diabetes, controlling blood sugar is a struggle every day. In fact, a report issued last year by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) showed that two out of three Americans with type 2 diabetes analyzed in a study were not in control of their blood sugar.

It is important to control blood sugar because it lowers the risk of serious health problems later. Diabetes can cause heart disease, stroke, blindness, loss of limbs and kidney disease.

But now, there’s new help to better manage type 2 diabetes. Life and fitness coach Bob Harper of NBC’s “The Biggest Loser” and a panel of diabetes experts created easy-to-understand and motivational steps people can take to get their blood sugar down. They are called 6.5 Steps Toward Better Blood Sugar Control. These steps are different because they can fit easily into everyday living.

“Through my years of coaching and training, I’ve worked with many people with type 2 diabetes and have seen how hard it can be to live with this disease,” said Bob Harper. “But I learned that anyone can change their life. It’s all about finding the right tools and motivation. I urge people with type 2 diabetes to step it up and use the 6.5 Steps and make them a part of their daily lives.”

The 6.5 Steps can help people with type 2 diabetes every day because they focus on the basics of diabetes management: eating healthy, being physically active, monitoring blood sugar and, when appropriate, taking one or more medicines. These all play a part to help lower blood sugar.

Healthy Eating: Healthy eating reduces the risk for complications such as heart disease and stroke. Good choices include many foods, such as vegetables, whole grains, fruits, nonfat dairy products, beans, and lean meats, poultry and fish. There is no one perfect food, but watching portion sizes is key to a healthy diet.

Physical Activity: Regular physical activity can lower blood sugar levels. It can also help manage weight and reduce the risk of developing heart disease and high blood pressure. There are little things people with type 2 diabetes can do every day to be more active, such as walking with a friend or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Blood Sugar Monitoring: There are two tests for checking blood sugar. One test is the blood sugar monitoring that patients do on their own. It gives people with diabetes a check of their blood sugar level at the time the test is taken. The other one is called the A1C test. The A1C test shows a person’s average blood sugar levels over the previous two to three months. Experts say that a good A1C goal is 6.5 percent or less for most people with type 2 diabetes.

Medicines: Most people with type 2 diabetes take medicine to help control their blood sugar levels. Many need more than one medicine to help treat the disease in different ways.

For people with type 2 diabetes, it is important that they team up with their doctor or other health care professional and think of them as a partner. They should work with their health care team to make a plan to get their blood sugar under control.

April 30, 2014

Type 2 Diabetes

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Type 2 diabetes is sometimes referred to as mature onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than Type I. In Type 2 diabetes the pancreas either does not produce adequate levels of insulin or the body becomes resistant to its own insulin.

Type I diabetes, also known as adolescent diabetes, differs from Type 2 in that the body stops producing insulin altogether. Type I diabetes is generally diagnosed in children or young adults. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in older adults, however, it is becoming substantially more prevalent in the younger population.

With the onset of diabetes, whether it be Type I or Type 2, we lose our ability to adequately utilize sugar. When this occurs, blood sugar levels increase due to the body’s inability to transport sugar into the cells and out of the blood stream. Sugar is very important in that it is the basic fuel source for the cells in our bodies. Insulin is necessary for the transport of sugar from the blood and into the cells.

Diabetes is a serious condition and can lead to many other health problems. Some problems that diabetics commonly encounter are an increased risk for heart and circulatory problems, high blood pressure, visual problems and blindness, nerve damage, and kidney damage. With the diagnosis of diabetes, it becomes extremely important that blood sugar fluctuations are tightly controlled. With good control of blood sugar levels and the prevention of prolonged periods of elevated blood sugar, people with diabetes can live long and healthy lives.

Fortunately for the newly diagnosed diabetic, there are more and more tools available to help monitor and control the condition. Glucose meters are becoming smaller and easier to use. Blood samples necessary for glucose meter use are much smaller than in the past. Painful finger pricks can now be avoided with blood samples being able to be taken from alternate, less sensitive areas, such as the forearm. In the relatively near future, there will be non-invasive glucose monitoring devices not requiring a sample of blood at all.

A simple blood test, known as the A1c test, can measure the average blood glucose levels over the previous three months. This test is a very good way to monitor and critique how effective current treatments, diet, medications, etc. have been recently. This test is now available for home use and as such does not even require a visit to the doctor.

Type 2 diabetics have more options available to them for blood sugar control than do Type I diabetics. Not only are there oral medications, often eliminating the need for insulin injection treatment, but other methods that may eliminate the need for medications altogether.

Type 2 diabetics should look to multiple sources of information in order to determine the best methods available to deal with their condition. A good start is a physician specializing in the treatment of diabetes. Most physician specialists will have nutritional counseling available to help understand the relationship of various food items with blood sugar levels.

Additionally, diabetics should become very familiar with vitamin, mineral, and herbal options to improve blood sugar metabolism and control. A few examples of supplements that are well known to help in this regard are chromium, magnesium, and vanadyl sulfate. Various natural glucose transport factors can be very helpful in aiding the body’s transport of glucose from the blood and into the cells. Vanadyl sulfate has been shown to improve glucose sensitivity and decrease insulin resistance.

Various herbal preparations have been shown to significantly improve blood sugar levels, sugar metabolism, and reportedly even improve the function of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Notably, Gymnema sylvestre, known as “sugar destroyer” in Sandskrit, has been shown to have positive effects and benefits for diabetics.

Along with proper nutrition, appropriate supplements and vitamins, other important considerations are weight control and exercise. Excess weight tremendously increases the burden on the pancreas as fat requires much more insulin than lean tissue. Exercise not only helps control body fat and reduce weight, but additionally aids the transport of sugar from the blood and into the cells.

Diabetes is a very serious condition, but proper diet, glucose monitoring, and exercise can substantially improve our ability to control the condition. We should attempt to educate ourselves not only in the importance of tight blood sugar control, but also the various methods and options available to help in this regard. By utilizing good judgment in diet, weight control, exercise, and appropriate supplementation, diabetics can markedly reduce complications and lead long and healthy lives.

For further information and valuable diabetes resources, please go to http://www.diabetessites.com

April 28, 2014

Two Types Of Diabetes & How They Differ

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There are two types of diabetes, which consists of Type I and Type II. It is important to understand the distinction between the two and how both are treated.

Type 1 diabetes is commonly found in children and/or adolescents, but may also occur in adults. With type 1 diabetes, there is almost always a complete deficiency of insulin. As a result, the most common treatment is insulin injections, a lifestyle that consists of both diet and exercise and regular monitoring of blood glucose levels with the use of blood testing monitors. Patients who have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can continue to enjoy a normal life providing they continue with their treatment and take special care to follow their doctor’s instructions and/or recommendation.

With type 2 diabetes, an individual’s insulin level is usually either normal or sometimes even elevated, but is not deficient. This form of diabetes is believed to be more complicated than type 1, but ironically is thought to be easier to treat. Because insulin is still being produced inside the body, type 2 diabetes often goes undetected for years. Symptoms are milder and may even be sporadic, which often reduces the level of concern. The main problem with type 2 diabetes going unnoticed is the potential for serious complications, including renal failure and coronary artery disease. The initial treatment phase of type 2 diabetes will likely include a lifestyle adjustment to feature increased physical activity and a diet that is geared toward weight loss. The next step, if necessary, will be medication and possibly insulin therapy if needed.

Both types of diabetes require that the patient maintain normal blood glucose levels in an effort to reduce the possibility of organ damage, including eyesight, kidney, blood circulation, etc. In order for this to occur, patients must carefully monitor their food intake and make sure to participate in regular exercise, all the while continuing to monitor their blood glucose level.

As of 2006, there is no known cure for diabetes. A chronic disease that effects many, diabetes is best treated through patient education, nutrition, self awareness and long-term care. In addition, patients are often urged to be aware of other symptoms that may indicate complications arising from diabetes.

The contents of this article are to be used for informational purposes only. It should not be used in conjunction with, or in place of, professional medical advice relating to diabetes. This article must not be used as a basis for diagnosing or treating diabetes, but rather an informational source designed to explain the difference between the two types. For further information, a diagnosis or recommended treatment method for diabetes, individuals should consult a licensed physician.

April 28, 2014

Treatment of Diabetes

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Now a day’s diabetes treatment has become a common disease among people. It is caused due to mismanagement of carbohydrate metabolism inside the body. Diabetes is identified with the excessive production of urine, hunger, thirst and excessive loss of weight, blurred vision, and delay in healing of skin, repeated infection, and excessive fatigue. Diabetes has got a serous issue of human health. It denotes sugar in blood and urine very excessively.

So, when it comes to treatment of diabetes the main concern should be given to control blood sugar, which is main cause of diabetes. Managing blood sugar is the stepping-stone of this diabetes treatment program. To remove the complications of diabetes one must take it seriously and adopt some good diet process or healthy exercise. Apart from doing so some take insulin and any other type of medication program to be cured to some extent. Frequent testing of blood sugar can denote you how much you have improved on your part to manage suitable measure of sugar in blood. It is very important to learn the right range of glucose in blood unless and until you cannot have the idea about the complication you are facing about this disease. It depends on age mainly such as in younger age assuming not much complication is there the suitable range of glucose is 80-120 mg/dL and in older age it is 100-140 mg/dL.

Diabetes program includes some specific self-treatments like having good and suitable diet, having proper exercise, maintaining healthy weight and medication. When it is about good and suitable diet it does not make any suggestion to take all dull food which are not of your interest rather it denotes to have more fruits, vegetables and grains that means you should be conscious in taking the foods of high nutrition and lower fat and calories. Avoid taking sweets and animal products with no limit. The main part of this diabetes treatment program is that you own self should be challenging in this task otherwise this program will be harder enough. Consult any dietitian about meal plan and try to maintain it at the fixed times every day with same amount according to your diet plan.

On the part of having proper exercise you should be cautious about all aerobic exercises. In this diabetes treatment program you can make your choices among the daily exercises like doing morning or evening walk, jogging, hiking, biking, swimming and any other exercises of heart and lungs. Remember giving consistency to your exercise process is very important to get the best result through it.

Try to maintain weight according to your activity level and age because overweight is dangerous factor which help to make your cells more resistant to insulin. Making suitable weight loss plan and going according to that can make its result more effectively.

Sometimes medication takes a very important role in case where it is found that good dieting and exercise are not fulfilling it purpose. This type of diabetes program includes the insert of insulin as per requirement. As it can’t be taken in form of pill some people have it injected by syringe or some have it with insulin pump.

So now it is very clear that diabetes is always manageable if the sufferer give a serious daily attention to it. Although diabetes stands for life long suffering, yet it never means the end of your life. You just have to remember that the disease will be in your control only and only if you are self disciplined for your each and every step of treatment program.

DISCLAIMER: This information is not presented by a medical practitioner and is for educational and informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read.

Since natural and/or dietary supplements are not FDA approved they must be accompanied by a two-part disclaimer on the product label: that the statement has not been evaluated by FDA and that the product is not intended to “diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.”

April 27, 2014

Traveling with Diabetes: 11 tips to make it easy for you

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Traveling with diabetes requires preparation both before and during your trip. Here are 11 tips to help you make sure your diabetes doesn’t interfere with the pleasures of travel.

1.Visit your doctor at leasta month before you leave to make sure your diabetes is under control. If you need to do any stabilizing, a month will give you enough time. The same month should let your body settle down after any necessary immunization shots, so get those at the same time.

2.Get a letter from your doctor certifying that you are diabetic, and listing the various medications and supplies you must carry with you. Without this, you might have difficulties passing through Security at airports and international border crossings.

3.Also get a prescription for your insulin or other diabetes medication. Even though you should have enough syringes, strips and medication to last for the duration of your trip, it’s always good to have a prescription in case you lose them, they become spoiled because of extreme weather conditions, or your trip lasts longer than you original planned.

4.Wear an ID bracelet announcing your have diabetes, and also carry a small card saying so in the local language of the places you will be visiting.

5.Learn to express specific diabetic requirements in the local languages. Since you probably won’t know how to pronounce the words, the easiest way is to carry them on a printed card and simply point to what you want to say.

6.Pack at least twice as much medication and supplies as you think you’ll need. Put half in your suitcase, and half in a special bag that never leaves your possession. The container for these supplies should be sturdy, preferably hard sided, for protection.

7.Carry a sealed pack containing hard candies or glucose tablets in case irregular eating makes your blood sugar drop too low. Your pack should also contain emergency snacks, such as crackers, cheese, fruit, juice — in case you must wait too long between meals, which can happen when we are traveling.

8.Insulin can lose its strength in extreme temperatures, so carry your supply, as well as pills and other medication, in a thermally insulated bag.

9.Carry bandages and first-aid cream, comfortable walking shoes and protective beach shoes. Your feet neet extra special care while you’re traveling.

10.While on your trip, check your blood sugar more often than usual. Many factors, such as fluctuating temperatures and changing time zones, can cause wild swings in your blood sugar levels. If you check often, you’ll be better able to take corrective action as needed.

11.Finally, contact the International Association for Medical Assistance to Travelers at 417 Center Street, Lewiston, NY 14092. They can provide you with a list of English speaking doctors in the countries you’ll be visiting.

As long as you take sensible precautions to care for your diabetes, there’s no reason why it needs to stand in the way of a happy travel experience. Bon voyage!

April 26, 2014

Toddlers with Diabetes: Caring for the Littlest Patients

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Toddlers with diabetes are suffering from Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes or diabetes juvenile. The number of children under the age of five being diagnosed with diabetes juvenile has almost doubled in the past five years. Caring for toddlers is a challenge under the best of circumstances, and toddlers with diabetes need even more special care and attention.

Symptoms

First, if you are wondering whether your toddler has diabetes in the first place, here are some signs to look for:

often complains of feeling thirsty

hungry more often

suddenly loses weight

urinates more than usual, diapers more wet than usual

occasional fruity smelling breath

If you notice any of these symptoms in your child, discuss with your doctor the possibility you have a toddler with diabetes.

Special challenges

You or your caregiver will have to closely monitor your child’s blood sugar throughout the day to be sure it stays within a safe range. Ideally this means 6-12 mmol just before meals.

Toddlers with diabetes also require daily insulin shots, which can be traumatic for you as well as your child! When administering both finger pricks for the blood sugar tests and the insulin shots, you should be as quick and calm as possible about the procedure. If your child is playing, go where he or she is rather than having them come to you. That helps establish the procedure as just a normal part of their day.

Of course, your child will resist these procedures, and it can be hard for parents and caregivers to remember they are doing this for the child’s health. It must be done, however, and you may have to learn to restrain the child gently. It also helps to give them a big hug and a kiss after it’s finished to make sure they understand you still love them even though this hurt a bit.

Another problem is that toddlers with diabetes can’t tell you when they are feeling the effects of low blood sugar, which is another reason for careful monitoring.

Toddlers in general can be picky eaters, and toddlers with diabetes are no different. The challenge here is in making sure that all your alternatives fit within a healthy and appropriate diabetic diet. Have as wide a selection of those foods available as possible so that when they do refuse certain foods, you can tempt them with an appropriate alternative.

Toddlers with diabetes should otherwise develop the same way, and at the same rate, as other children of their age. So as long as you take the necessary precautions to treat the diabetes, and your child seems normal in all other ways, there’s no reason why he or she shouldn’t be a perfectly healthy and happy child.

April 25, 2014

The X Factor: How Fast Can It Ruin Your Life?

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It was absolutely embarrassing! I couldn’t stay awake. After eating a normal breakfast lunch or dinner I was out like a light. No I am not talking about the Thanksgiving turkey tryptophan thing that is the brunt of so many jokes-this was not funny at all.

I tried to cope with this for over a year until one day driving in town on a busy street in broad daylight- I fell asleep at the wheel. That was bad enough but as it happened my fiance was with me to witness the event. Fortunately the worst that happened was I scared the hell out of both of us. That did it- I had to get some help.

I went to see a health practitioner who knew immediately what I had-Syndrome X.

I still remember going home to see what else I could find out about Syndrome X besides the take home literature which was very scant. It was not a common term for sure. There just wasn’t much information out there in 1995.

In a nutshell this ominous sounding term refers to a group of symptoms centered on insulin resistance. Without making it too confusing I’ll try to explain.

After a meal someone with Syndrome X will have elevated glucose in the blood which signals the pancreas to make more insulin. This forces the blood sugar down, which can lead to food cravings, which can lead to – you guessed it- OBESITY and a host of other serious problems like hypertension, high triglycerides, diabetes, and coronary heart disease.

Syndrome X interferes with the body’s ability to burn food. Muscle cells become more resistant to insulin thus reducing the ability to absorb nutrients which in turn causes the pancreas to produce more insulin. Got it? Let me try again.

If you have Syndrome X your body’s metabolism is screwed up (not a medical term). It causes you to have food cravings notably for sweets (sugar) and bread and pasta (white flour) to a point of almost being addictive. Can you see where this is headed?

Some think that Syndrome X is actually caused by eating too many high carb foods like bread, pasta and sweets. As many as 75 million Americans have Syndrome X in one degree or another. Sure is a good thing I wasn’t a snackaholic, chocaholic, or addicted to pasta and bread.

Is it any coincidence at all that the prevalence of Syndrome X, pre-diabetes, and obesity in all age groups-especially children-has something to do with the much more serious problems of diabetes, hypertension, higher triglycerides, and CHD?

That’s the bad news! The good news is that the more serious problems can all be prevented. Weight loss of up to 15 % of your current weight will have an impact on lowering your blood pressure and raising your HDL or good cholesterol. A diet low in refined carbs such as soda, high fructose corn syrup, sugar and white flour bread and pasta will help with weight loss and getting your triglycerides down. And of course exercise-even a 30 minute walk a day can do wonders.

So be good to yourself, your spouse and children; lose the weight, exercise, and change your diet. If you don’t the evil downward spiral of Syndrome X will ruin your life for

April 24, 2014