Monthly Archives: November 2012

Don’t Spend Money on Acne Remedies. Fight Acne Naturally.

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Acne is commonly a skin condition that is seen as whiteheads, blackheads, pustules or infected and inflamed nodules. Acne often is found on a persons face, chest, neck, and back. While many acne types usually affect the teenagers, various acne conditions are not restricted to a particular age group; even adults in their late 20s or even well into their 40s – have the possibility to also suffer from acne.

Eventhough acne is not life threatening, it can cause unwanted permanent scarring and cause emotional distress if it is not treated properly. People with Acne problems often tend to be more self-conscious about their appearances when having outbreaks or blemishes.

Instead of having you dig deeper into your pocket for various types of expensive Acne Treatment remedies, you should attempt to fight acne naturally by avoiding your pores to get clogged. For many people with acne outbreaks, it is about avoiding the common acne outbreak. Just by following some of the simply steps listed below, people that often have outbreaks can dramatically decrease their chance of another acne outbreaks:

– By not touching your face with your hands, including popping the zits.

– By washing your skin with a mild soap, acne cleanser such as Proactiv Solutions

– By avoiding stressful situations

– By allowing your skin to breath; wear loose clothing

November 30, 2012

Don’t Believe These Acne Myths

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There are many allegations as to the causes of acne. As technology and science help us find the actual roots, we are able to dispel many of the misconceptions surrounding acne. However, the myths still persist. Here are some more commonly known myths:

Myth: Acne is caused by poor hygiene.

Lack of cleanliness is not the reason for acne. There are skin infections associated with acne due to a mixture of sebum and dead cells that lie beneath the surface of the skin. Although gentle cleansing of the skin with soap and water once or twice a day will assist in keeping skin as healthy as possible, it is ineffective in clearing away the skin infections. Take care not to scrub too hard as this could further aggravate acne.

Myth: Grease and Chocolate will cause acne.

People have believed for years that eating chocolate will cause pimples. There is no scientific proof for this – studies have shown no direct relationship between consuming chocolate and acne breakouts. This is also true of other foods like potato chips and French fries. Eating too much of these types of food is, however, unhealthy, and advisable to eat in moderation.

Note: Although chocolate and greasy foods do not cause acne, some foods DO seem to exacerbate it. Milk and foods high in iodine (as found in seafood) seem to aggravate acne.

Myth: Sex is directly linked to acne.

Everything from masturbation to celibacy has been blamed for acne. This again is false. Although there is a link between hormone levels and sexual activity, it is unclear what the link between sex and levels of sebum (causing acne.) Emotions and stress also affect hormone levels.

Myth: You will grow out of acne.

Acne may last a matter of weeks or as long as several years. There is no need to try to live with it when there are so many over-the-counter treatments available to anyone suffering from the discomfort and embarrassment of acne. Dermatologists are also easily accessible for more severe cases.

Myth: Acne only affects teenagers.

Although 85% of adolescents experience acne, adults are susceptible to suffering from acne when they are in their 30s or 40s.

Myth: Acne is only a superficial condition.

Due to the severity of physical disfigurement acne leads to psychological stress. There are strong links to depression, social withdrawal and low self-esteem.

Myth: Popping/Squeezing pimples will get rid of them faster.

This may actually aggravate acne by spreading the bacteria which is causing it! Squeezing pimples can also lead to permanent scarring.

Myth: Sun exposure will help clear up acne.

Although short-term effects of the sun seem to dry out excess oils, the skin quickly adapts to sun exposure. This eliminates long-term benefits from sun exposure and increases the potential for skin damage and cancer.

Myth: Wearing makeup causes acne.

Healthy skin is the best way to avoid acne. Because some makeups can clog pores, acne can in fact result. Cosmetics have flooded the market with labels indicating they are noncomedogenic or nonacnegenic, which means they will not cause acne. These brands of makeup are safe to use. Some actually include ingredients that help treat acne.

Myth: Using more acne medication will treat the condition quicker.

Excess use of ointments may actually irritate the skin, worsening the condition. Oral medications can be dangerous to your overall health. Always use medications as directed.

November 29, 2012

Does The Proactive Acne Solution Really Work?

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Do you struggle daily with zits? Maybe you’ve tried it all and nothing seems to work right. This can be a horrible affliction to grapple with. Not only does it squelch your self-esteem, but it can leave permanent damage.

No one wants to deal with the aftermath of severe acne at age 30. One problem is that so many acne sufferers tackle this burden in the wrong manner.

There are ways to get rid of acne. There are ways to obliterate this irksome dilemma once and for all. Technology is one your side, folks. With the various new-age break-throughs regarding skin disorders, you can achieve that complexion you’ve always dreamt of.

Have you ever heard of proactive acne solution? This is one treatment system that has proven wonderful for acne sufferers around the globe.

I’m sure by now that you’ve seen the infomercials for proactive acne solution. This innovative blemish fighting system has proven its amazing results to many. Even celebrities are getting on board to advertise and promote this stuff.

Stars like Britney Spears, Jessica Simpson and P Diddy are paying homage to its benefits. All three celebrities suffered from routine bouts with blemishes, but saw fast results with proactive acne solution.

They continue to use the skin care system today in order to prevent new breakouts from forming. Too many individuals spend their time browsing through local drug stores for that new acne cleanser or cream.

Well, if you’ve exhausted all the routine over-the-counter products, then maybe it’s time to give proactive acne solution a shot. There’s really nothing to lose. The system even comes with a money-back guarantee. Now that’s confidence.

If you’ve strolled through your local shopping mall lately, then you’ve most likely encountered proactive acne solution. There are booths set up around the country, promoting and selling this new wonder product.

Folks of all ages are simply sick and tired of battling pimples. Fortunately these days there are products such as proactive acne solution that really work.

You basically use this skin care system day and night to battle your current zits and prevent new breakouts from arising. So stop wasting your time with those on-the-spot creams and gels that don’t work.

Get online today and read about proactive acne solution. You can even make a purchase via the Internet.

November 28, 2012

Do you have Rosacea? How to diagnose this chronic skin condition.

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If you suffer from a red complexion, flushing or blushing, a red nose and cheeks and dry, flaky skin with pimples, you probably suffer from the chronic skin condition rosacea. Formerly known as acne rosacea, rosacea is more common in women than men, although men often have more severe symptoms. Most people who have rosacea are fair-skinned, fair-haired and blue-eyed, although it is also seen more rarely in dark-skinned people. The disease affects at least 14 million people in the United States of America, typically between 20 and 50 years of age.

The main symptoms of the skin condition are:

– a burning or tingling sensation

– a persistant redness after blushing or flushing

– pimples, papules or pustules on the face

– tiny visible blood vessels under the skin

– thickening of skin, especially around the nose area

– gritty, uncomfortable eyes (ocular rosacea)

The true cause of rosacea is not really known but certain factors are known to aggravate the condition. Sufferers should avoid exposure to extreme temperatures and weather, such as the sun, the cold and wind. Sun avoidance is particularly important, and sun screens, hats and parasols are useful ways to avoid sun-related flare-ups. Alcohol and hot drinks and food are also known to excacerbate rosacea, as is exercising in hot temperatures and hot showers, baths, steam rooms and saunas. Loofahs, rough towels, exfoliators, astringents and cosmetics with perfumes and many additives should also be avoided. Gentle perfume-free cover-up cosmetics can help disguise a flare-up and reduce the psychological and social effects of rosacea.

Rosacea is a condition that is controlled rather than cured and many people find that keeping a diary helps them to pin-point their own triggers. Keeping cool, drinking water to stay hydrated and using natural gentle skin care products go a long way to controlling this chronic condition.

You should, of course, consult your dermatologist for advice about prescription creams and other procedures that may be available to relieve the symptoms of rosacea. Generally, rosacea treatment is aimed at the control of redness, inflammation and skin eruptions, and this treatment is necessary to prevent permanent damage to the skin.

If he decides that you do have rosacea, a dermatologist will often prescribe a combination of oral antibiotics and the use of antibiotic gel as initial treatment. The oral antibiotics will reduce the redness and reduce the pustules, then the topical gel may help to keep the symptoms under control. The dermatologist will also be able to help a patient look at lifestyle factors to help control the rosacea in the future.

Steroids are also often prescribed for rosacea because they appear to relieve the symptoms quickly, but sufferers should be aware that topical steroids are thought to make the symptoms worse longterm. The steroids dilate the blood vessels in the face and thin the skin and dermis by breaking down elastin and collagen in the skin’s structure. Topical steroids have actually been thought to cause rosacea in the first place in some instances.

November 27, 2012

Do Not Let The Galaxy Of Acne Products In The Market To Stun You!

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Remember, every standard acne product has a handout, explaining the salient features of the product, its ingredients and above all, a warning. No acne product is meant to cause intentional harm to anyone.

Every product in the market claims a set standard of excellence. When the market is flooded with many such products, the buyer, rather the actual person undergoing the suffering of acne, has a double responsibility. Firstly, to buy the correct product and secondly, to apply it as per the directions.

If the rules regarding the later are not adhered to properly, please note that the manufacturer has carefully worded many escape clauses for his own legal and financial safety. For, he has to protect himself first. Your protection from acne, is his secondary priority, strictly speaking. This is, however, not to doubt his intentions.

Individual constitution is a new concept for the modern mind, and acne is no exception,

The exact cause and the possible solution, will have to be well thought off by an individual, after studying the subject acne. No doubt, medication is an important part of the healing process, but most of the mistakes are committed here, if you follow them without knowing the root cause of acne. For example, wearing tight clothes is known to cause body acne by trapping sweat. In such conditions, if you take antibiotics, the result is bound to be unfavorable. It may even lead to side-effects.

The galaxy of acne products in the market may stun you. Skin exfoliation products, soaps, lotions, gels, creams and much more are readily available. Supplementation is a tricky business and is best done with professional help. It should never be considered a substitute for sound diet, environmental awareness and stress management.

Do not consider every type of acne a disease as such. It may just be a temporary condition of the skin, an irritation with a definite, fixed cycle. Let it come and go and die its natural death. Do not fear or interfere in its working.

The totality of the circumstances contributing to acne, are not known and will perhaps never be known. The environmental conditions vary and the same individual may react differently in different seasons. So it is always advisable to gain a dermatologist’s advice well before trying on to any of the acne products.

November 26, 2012

Do I Need to Stop My Acne Skin Care Regimen During Pregnancy?

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Pregnancy usually brings along with it a host of medical concerns which prompt behavioral and lifestyle changes. It is common knowledge that pregnant women should avoid smoking and drinking, not to mention some excessively physical activities. But there are also a host of other medicines and procedures which should be avoided during pregnancy. So, the question is, how does pregnancy affect acne skin care regimens?

Many acne medicines are quite explicit about the fact that you should not use them during pregnancy. Roaccutane and Accutane are certainly among these. For those of us that have used the products, the medicine packaging picturing a pregnant woman with an ‘X’ over her sent a strong message that they should not be used if you are, or might become pregnant. There are other medicines, such as Tetracycline tablets and topical retinoids such as Tretinoin and Adapalene which can have detrimental effects on the bones and teeth of developing fetuses. While these medicines should clearly be avoided because of the detrimental effects they have on your baby, there are other medicines which should potentially be stopped simply because they are no longer appropriate when pregnant.

Pregnancy is often associated with a period of drier than normal skin. As a result, a number of acne medicines which are designed specifically to dry out the skin, namely benzoyl peroxide cream or gel may no longer be appropriate.

But does this mean that there are no acne skin care regimens that can be followed? Absolutely not. There are in fact a number of milder and often natural solutions which can contribute to healthier acne free skin which either have no, or even positive effects on your child. To replace harsh creams or gels designed to dry out the skin, an excellent alternative is tea tree oil. A milder facial wash can also provide the cleansing effect of an acne wash without over-drying your skin, which is naturally drier due to pregnancy. But because you may be giving up some of the acne fighting power by switching over to a milder wash, it is a good idea to supplement your acne fighting regimen with some natural clay masks such as Kaolin and Bentonite which will absorb oil and clear blocked pores naturally.

The second avenue through which pregnant women can clear up their skin while positively affecting the health of the child, is through their diet. By consuming higher quantities of raw vegetables, whose antioxidant properties serve to take free radicals (also referred to as bacteria) out of your system, you can cut down on the amount of bacteria released through your pores. In addition, by cutting back on the quantity of sugars and refined carbohydrates that you eat, you will naturally cut down on the amount of sebum or oil that your body produces. This will keep your pores clearer and allow the bacteria which passes through your pores to come out cleanly and without causing infection and acne. These approaches, in addition to providing you with clearer skin, are a safe and healthy alternative to acne fighting while simultaneously improving the health of your child.

November 25, 2012

Do Cosmetics Causes Acne?

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For decades, dermatologists and cosmetologists alike have debated the effects of cosmetics on the skin, particularly in acne sufferers. Make-up has often been branded an “acne Catch-22” – you want something to cover the redness, but you’re told it may actually be causing your acne. Fortunately, this is only partly true. To understand how to approach the make-up issue, we should start with a discussion of “cosmetic acne.”

Cosmetic Acne & Skin Care – A mild-mannered cousin. Acne cosmetica, or acne that is caused by cosmetics, is a mild and fairly common form of acne. Because it is triggered by topical products rather than the complex process that creates true acne, it can strike anyone – even people who are not physiologically prone to the condition. Characterized by small, rashy pink bumps on the cheeks, chin and forehead, it typically develops over the course of a few weeks or months and may persist indefinitely. If you’ve recently started using a new skincare product and you’re experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, discontinue use of the new product for a few days and see if your breakout subsides.

NOTE: While studies have shown that make-up does not cause true acne, it can exacerbate the condition. So it’s helpful to be aware of common topical triggers, no matter what kind of acne you have.

Cosmetic Acne & Skin Care – The culprit: Comedogenics. Ever wonder where your make-up goes over the course of the day? Some of it is rubbed off by contact with your hands and your clothing, and some of it migrates across your skin, settling into your pores – much like rainwater collects wherever there are small holes in the ground. Some make-ups include ingredients that are considered comedogenic, or substances that are known to clog pores. Although these cosmetics may not cause true plugging of the follicle, certain ingredients may induce follicular irritation. The result? The small, persistent bumps known as “cosmetic acne.”

Do Cosmetics Causes Acne?

Get Help with Your Acne – 60-Day Money-Back Guarantee

Cosmetic Acne & Skin Care – Seven rules for a clean beauty routine. With so many products making so many claims, it’s easy to be confused by clever marketing. Fortunately, just a bit of education can get you on the path to choosing the proper cosmetics and using them wisely. Here are seven good rules to follow for a healthy make-up regimen:

1. Avoid penetrating oils. Contrary to popular belief, not all oils are comedogenic. Petroleum products, mineral oil and sunflower oil do not penetrate into the pore. Most cosmetic oils, however, can aggravate acne – so it’s best to avoid them. One of the most common acne triggers in skin products, especially lotions and sunscreens, is lanolin, a fatty acid extracted from sheep’s wool. Isopropyl Myristate, which promotes smooth, even application in many foundations, is such an aggressive penetrator that it’s the main ingredient in most rust-removers! In general, products labeled “oil-free” and “non-comedogenic” are less likely to clog your pores and trigger breakouts.

2. Steer clear of sweet smells. Fragrance is a major cause of allergic and irritant reactions on the face. Even products that claim to be “unscented” may include fragrances added to mask the smell of other ingredients. It’s best to stick with products labeled as “fragrance-free” or “hypo-allergenic.” Of course, reactions to fragrance differ dramatically, and you may find certain perfumes that don’t affect your skin. The most common offenders are fragrances in the ambrette, bergamot, cinnamate and musk families. If the derivatives of your favorite face cream or foundation’s scent are not easily determined from the product label, try a patch test on the skin behind your ear. If no irritation appears after three days of repeated application, you may continue usage on a larger area.

3. Be smart about shadow and blush. The stuff that puts the sparkle in your eye shadow, face powder and blush is usually mica, a common mineral. The jagged, flaky shape of mica particles can cause irritation and/or clogging in the follicle, so it’s best to use products without too much shimmer. Likewise, many of the red dyes used to put a bloom in your cheeks are coal tar derivatives; not surprisingly, these substances are comedogenic, too. Check the labels for blushes that use carmine, which has been a natural, healthy cosmetic colorant since the time of the Aztecs. Also, cream blushes are more likely to have comedogenic ingredients, so stick to powder or gel blushes.

4. Get wise to eye creams. Because of the delicacy of the skin around the eyes, creams created for this area are often thicker and greasier than regular facial moisturizers. Heavy eye creams and oily eye make-up removers can promote milia, tiny white cysts under the eyes. These kinds of products can also migrate to neighboring areas, creating acne on the cheeks, temples and forehead.

5. Style your hair with care. Most hair products are full of the ingredients we’d like to keep away from our skin: alcohol, adhesives and oils. So if you’re prone to acne, use care when styling your hair – cover your skin when you spray, and try to keep oils, mousses, gels and pomades away from the skin at the hairline. And don’t use hair products when you exercise; perspiration from your scalp can carry styling products onto your skin, contributing to new breakouts.

6. Wash after exercising. While we know that sweat doesn’t cause acne, it can promote it in those who are prone – and make-up can make matters worse. Even non-comedogenic products can cause clogging or irritation in the presence of heavy perspiration. As a rule, it’s best to wash immediately after exercising with a medicated exfoliating cleanser.

7. Use the right lip lube. If you have problems with pimples around the mouth area, you might want to reconsider the products you use on your lips. Lipsticks and glosses are greasy by nature, with high concentrations of petroleum, wax and other comedogenic substances. The greater the shine, the greater the potential for pore-clogging – so if you’re breaking out, try going for a matte finish rather than a high gloss.

In general, it’s fine to doll up! Just choose your cosmetics carefully – look for products that are oil-free and non-comedogenic. Read labels carefully to avoid common topical triggers. And of course, use your common sense; if a product that looks okay on the label is irritating your skin, discontinue usage right away.

November 24, 2012